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July 7, 2020

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Fragrance Free Environment - Policy 

“All staff, patients, and visitors shall:  Refrain from wearing cologne, perfume, scented personal care products such as body lotions, sprays, and powders, scented deodorant and hair care products, and aftershave lotions; avoid bringing in scented flowers.  Scented plants will be removed from the property. Refrain from bringing scented air fresheners or personal scented hand lotions from home."


Smoke Free Ontario Act, 2017


Smoke Free Ontario Act 2018

 


News


Premier Wynne announces Local Health Hub in Manitouwadge.

Please Click Here for a PDF copy of the press release regarding the recent announcement  from Premier Wynne on recent news involving Manitouwadge.                                                                                                                         


Weather


  

Patient Safety Indicator Reporting

The possibility of acquiring a health care-associated infection is a definite reality at any hospital. All Ontario hospitals are focusing on minimizing infections and are working hard to reduce risk factors that contribute to the spread of infections.


Patient safety is about managing and reducing risk to ensure that the care patients receive is as safe as possible. Improving patient safety is about creating an environment that is transparent and committed to change. By visiting www.ontario.ca/patientsafety the public can access information on patient safety issues.

GOOD HAND WASHING BY EVERYONE, HEALTHCARE STAFF, PHYSICIANS, VOLUNTEERS, PATIENTS AND VISITORS, IS THE SINGLE-MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

SANTÉ MANITOUWADGE HEALTH
2015-2016

 

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb
Mar
Apr
May
June

Number of new C. Diff Cases

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
0

C. Diff Rate

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
0

Number of new MRSA Cases

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

      0
0

MRSA Rate

0

0

0

0

0

0

1.94

0

0

0

0
0

Number of new VRE Cases

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
0

VRE Cases

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0
     0

The infection rate is calculated as a rate per 1,000 patient days. Patient days are defined as the sum of all days that services were provided to all in-patients during the reporting period.  The only exception to this is in the calculation of the C-Difficile rate. For this rate, children under the age of one are not included in the patient days as C-Difficile is normal flora for this age group.  The rates of Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI’s) are calculated as follows:

Number of new hospital acquired infections (HAI) in our facility      x 1000
Total number of patient days (for one month)  


These rates will vary from month to month and the smaller the facility the greater the rates will vary. For example: 1 new HAI divided by 380 (patient days) multiplied by 1000 would equal to a rate of 2.63%.  Whereas 2 new HAI’s with the same patient days would equal a rate of 5.26%.

Clostridium Difficile

Hospitals are required to report their rates of Clostridium Difficile (C-Diff) and post the rates on their hospital website.  

What is C-Diff?


C-Diff is one of the many types of bacteria that can be found in stool (bowel movement) and has been a known cause of health care-associated diarrhea for about 30 years and is one of the most common infections found in hospitals and long-term care facilities. It occurs naturally in 3-5% of adults without causing symptoms.  A C-Diff infection occurs when other good bacteria in the bowel are eliminated or decreased allowing the C-Diff bacteria to grow and produce toxin. The toxin produced can damage the bowel and cause diarrhea. 


Who is at risk?

Healthy people are not usually susceptible to C-Diff. seniors, and people who have other illnesses or conditions being treated with antibiotics, are at greater risk of an infection from C-Diff.


What are the symptoms of C-Diff? 

The usual symptoms are mild but can be severe. Main symptoms are watery diarrhea, fever, abdominal pain/tenderness.  Blood may or may not be present in the stools.


How is C-Diff diagnosed? 

When a patient presents with watery diarrhea, a sample of the stool is sent to our lab and can be tested for C-Diff.


How does C-Diff spread?

When a person has C-Diff, the bacteria in their stool can contaminate surfaces such as toilets, bedpans, commode chairs, and door handles (if stool is on hands). Other healthy individuals can contaminate their hands if they touch these items. If these individuals then touch their mouths without washing their hands, they can become infected. C-Diff produces spores that survive for long periods and are resistant to destruction by many environmental factors (e.g. temperature, humidity).


How is C-Diff treated?
People with mild symptoms may not need treatment. For more severe disease, antibiotics are required.

Antibiotic resistant organisms (ABO)

Hospitals are required to report their rates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia’s and post the rates on their hospital website.  A bacteremia is when the bacteria enters the bloodstream and causes an infection there.   People may have MRSA and VRE in their body and cause no symptoms (colonized) however MRSA and VRE can cause mild to severe infections in some people. 


Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

What is methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)?
MRSA is a bacterial infection resistant to antibiotic Methicillin. Staphylococcus aureus, sometimes referred to simply as "staph or staph A" is a common bacterium found on the skin of healthy people. If staph gets into the body it can cause a minor infection such as boils or pimples or serious infections such as pneumonia or blood infections.
One antibiotic commonly used to treat staph infections is Methicillin. While Methicillin is very effective in treating most staph infections, some staph bacteria have developed a resistance to Methicillin and can no longer be killed by this antibiotic. The resistant bacteria are called Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus or MRSA.


Vancomycin REsistant Enterococcus (VRE):

What is Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus?
Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) are strains of enterococci bacteria that have become resistant to the antibiotic Vancomycin.  Enterococci are naturally found in the bowels of most people but can also be found in wounds, ulcers and medical device sites in hospitalized patients. Enterococci are a common cause of health care associated infection.


How are MRSA and VRE bacteremia’s diagnosed?
A blood culture is sent to THRHSC lab for testing. 


How are MRSA and VRE spread?
The single most important mode of transmission of MRSA and VRE is via the hands of health care workers that have the bacteria on their hands from contact with colonized or infected patients and/or contaminated material or equipment.  If the health care worker then touches a patient they may become colonized/or infected with MRSA or VRE.  The bacteria may then spread to the bloodstream and become a bacteremia.


How are MRSA and VRE bacteremia’s treated?
The results of the blood culture will, in addition to identifying the presence of MRSA/VRE bacteria, include a list of antibiotics that the bacteria are susceptible to.  These antibiotics will then be used to treat the bacteremia.


GOOD HAND WASHING BY EVERYONE, HEALTHCARE STAFF, PHYSICIANS, VOLUNTEERS, PATIENTS AND VISITORS, IS THE SINGLE-MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES.


More information on reportable patient safety indicators may be found at:  www.ontario.ca/patientsafety


Hand Hygiene

Hand Hygiene (HH) Compliance Rates

Just clean your hands. It doesn't get much simpler than that. Evidence shows that hand hygiene can decrease infections in health care settings and is the single most important method of preventing infections.

Starting April 30, 2009 all Ontario hospitals will post annually on their web sites, compliance rates for:

  1. hand hygiene before initial contact with the patient/patient's environment for all health care providers
  2. hand hygiene after contact with the patient/patient's environment for all health care providers

Compliance Rates

08/09

09/10

10/11

11/12

12/13

Before initial patient/patient environment contact

63.16

71.25

68.33

76.47

83.16

After patient/patient environment contact

51.32

61.25

70.67

82.35

85.26

 

Compliance Rates

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

Before initial patient/patient environment contact

91.89

96.50

91 

 

 

After patient/patient environment contact

94.87

 95.30

94 

 

 

 


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